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Lawsuits filed to stop the removal of memorials to Confederate leaders and a pro-slavery congressman in a South Carolina city have been dropped. The Post and Courier reports that the American Heritage Association helped fund one of the lawsuits. It had been filed by descendants of John C. Calhoun, a former congressman and vice president who died before the Civil War. The suit had opposed the city of Charleston’s removal of Calhoun’s statue. Another suit opposed the removal of a Robert E. Lee Memorial Highway marker in Charleston, and the renaming of an auditorium that had been named after a treasury secretary of the Confederacy.

  • Updated

Lawsuits filed to stop the removal of memorials to Confederate leaders and a pro-slavery congressman in a South Carolina city have been dropped. The Post and Courier reports that the American Heritage Association helped fund one of the lawsuits. It had been filed by descendants of John C. Calhoun, a former congressman and vice president who died before the Civil War. The suit had opposed the city of Charleston’s removal of Calhoun’s statue. Another suit opposed the removal of a Robert E. Lee Memorial Highway marker in Charleston, and the renaming of an auditorium that had been named after a treasury secretary of the Confederacy.

  • Updated

A proposal for South Dakota's public school standards for American history was influenced by a conservative private college enjoying outsize influence among top Republicans. Michigan-based Hillsdale College's “1776 Curriculum” is seen as a rebuttal to the New York Times’ “1619 Project,” which reexamined the United States’ founding with the institution of slavery at the center. South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem employed a retired professor from the college to develop the standards. But some South Dakota educators, including one teacher who was part of the commission that developed the standards, say the proposal does not keep in mind the practical needs of the classroom.

Queen Elizabeth II inherited millions of subjects around the world Upon taking the throne in 1952. Many of them were unwilling. Today, in the British Empire’s former colonies, her death brings complicated feelings, including anger. Beyond official condolences praising the queen’s longevity and service, there is some bitterness about the past in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and elsewhere. Talk has turned to the legacies of colonialism, from slavery to corporal punishment in African schools to looted artifacts held in British institutions. For many, the queen came to represent all of that during her seven decades on the throne.

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Independent U.N. human rights experts are expressing concerns about the adverse impact on the rights of racial and ethnic minorities from the U.S. Supreme Court decision that stripped away constitutional protections for abortion in the United States. They called on the Biden administration and state governments to do more buttress those rights. The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination said it was concerned about higher rates of maternal mortality and morbidity, among a host of concerns about the rights of Blacks, Latinos, Indigenous peoples, foreign-born migrants and others in the United States.

Authorities say a former Southern California man who convinced troubled girls as young as 12 to perform masochistic acts and urged one to become his sex slave has pleaded guilty to a federal sexual exploitation charge. Prosecutors say Matthew Locher pleaded guilty Monday. Prosecutors say Locher was living in Redondo Beach when he got into online conversations targeting girls suffering from mental health issues, such as depression, anorexia and suicidal thoughts. Authorities say he groomed them to engage in self-mutilation and send him images. Authorities say that encouraged by Locher, another 12-year-old girl ran away from her Ohio home after setting it on fire in a failed bid to kill her parents.

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Joanna Schroeder has a warning for parents of teen and tween white boys: If you don't pay attention to their online lives, the white supremacists will.

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