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Fur is dead

Re: “Legislating what you wear?” (T&D, March 14), Will Coggin works for a front group for industries that profit from intensively confining and slaughtering animals, so it’s no surprise that he’s upset that kind people around the world are shunning fur.

Consumers could once claim ignorance about where fur comes from, but today, when anyone with a smartphone can pull up videos of animals going insane on fur farms or being beaten and skinned alive, that is no longer an option.

Not surprisingly, more and more people are saying “no” to fur. Major fashion brands, including Gucci, Versace, Chanel, Donna Karan, Michael Kors — and many more — have ditched fur. Los Angeles, San Francisco, and West Hollywood have banned the sale of new fur. And Norway — which was once the world’s largest producer of fox fur — Germany, Japan and several other countries have taken steps to shut down fur farms.

Using animals for fashion also comes with the same environmental baggage as using them for food. Fur coats and trim, just like other animal skins, are loaded with chemicals to keep them from decomposing in the buyer’s closet. The World Bank ranks the process of fur dressing and dyeing as one of the world’s five worst industries for toxic-metal pollution.

Sustainable, vegan materials — such as faux fur made from hemp, frayed denim, or recycled plastic bottles — are kinder to animals and the environment.

Fashion can be fickle, but consumers, designers and trendsetting cities agree on this point: Fur is dead.

Paula Moore

The PETA Foundation

Norfolk, Virginia

Outstanding 'musical journey'

What an outstanding concert of classical piano music was enjoyed on the evening of Feb. 16 at Stevenson Auditorium in Orangeburg.

The event was sponsored by the Orangeburg Music Club. Dr. Eunjung Choi, associate professor of piano and coordinator of keyboard studies at Claflin University, presented a "musical journey" with selections by composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, John Field, Enrique Granados, Alexander Borodine and Emma Lou Diemer.

Her excellent technique and beautiful touch on the keyboard as well as the program with a variety of selections provided a memorable evening of classical piano music for those in attendance.

The Orangeburg Music Club invites you to look for upcoming events such as the concert and plan to be in attendance.

Dale Clark

Orangeburg Music Club

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