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Alan Wilson in Orangeburg

South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson speaks at an Orangeburg County Republican Party event Monday.

South Carolina is prepared to pursue litigation on several fronts "up to the U.S. Supreme Court if necessary," South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson said.

Wilson was one of several elected state constitutional officers who spoke at an Orangeburg County Republican Party fundraiser Monday.

One issue involved the state voter ID law submitted to the U.S. Justice Department for review. Wilson said he has "no faith that it will do the right thing."

"I can tell you we won't lay down on this," he said.

The state Democratic Caucus lodged a formal objection to the law with the Justice Department last week. The law passed on the strength of the Republican majority in the General Assembly. Justice requested more information Monday before making a decision.

On Aug. 12, the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta struck down the health care reform law's mandate that nearly all Americans buy insurance as unconstitutional. Wilson feels the verdict increases the chances the U.S. Supreme Court may hear the case by next summer.

"The battle may have been won but the war is still going," Wilson said. "I am working with 25 other state attorneys general on this. It is my hope it will be heard before the next presidential election.

"This is an important piece of legislation because it does something that Congress has never been able to do before: require you to enter a private contract to defray health care costs. We will fight that."

Wilson also vowed to sue the National Labor Relations Board if it succeeds in its complaint against Boeing that challenged the jetliner manufacturer's decision to locate in South Carolina. He said such a decision would have the effect of attracting jobs.

"Imagine the statement we are making to the world," Wilson said. "The small business owner can't afford to litigate against the NLRB. The ones who are in union states are saying, ‘It's not worth my time to fight, so I'll just stay put.'

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"Businesses will not come ... here or maybe the U.S. just to have someone tell them they can't expand their business. That's bad for South Carolina and bad for our country."

Other GOP elected officials also spoke to the gathering. South Carolina Secretary of State Mark Hammond said his office took in $234,000 last year in fines against companies violating state law. He said it is the largest amount ever collected.

Mick Zais, South Carolina superintendent of education, supported what he called "a strong teacher protection act and charter school bill" in next year's General Assembly session.

Lieutenant Governor Ken Ard was also on hand but had to leave before addressing the gathering.

Contact the writer: psarata@timesanddemocrat.com or 803-533-5540.

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