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Lake Marion Technology Center Automotive Technology Advance Level class

Lake Marion Technology Center Automotive Technology Advance Level class members are, first row from left, Zachary Herron, A’Dreon Davis, Marcus Young, Osman White; second row, Zachary Wilson, Deandre Holback, Anthony Rivers, William Meyers, Jonias Blocker.

SANTEE - The Automotive Technology Program at Lake Marion High School and Technology Center offers students two extraordinary opportunities; one is to achieve Automotive Service Excellence Certification and the other is to participate in paid internships. Students can also earn a maximum of 12 dual credit courses for college.

The ASE certification acknowledges that an automotive technology student has the ability to provide quality vehicle repairs and services. Dual credit gives students high school and college credit for the Automotive Technology classes.

Lake Marion Technology Center is exclusively tailored for providing work-based learning opportunities and certifications for students in this program. The program has received NATEF accreditation renewal for 2017-2022.

LMHS Automotive Technology instructor David Dees recently announced that four outstanding students in the program - Zachary Herron, Justin Parker, Marquize Young and William Meyer, have achieved their ASE certification and six college credits this school year and all of them are planning to continue their automotive technology studies at institutions of higher learning to pursue careers in this field.

Dees currently has five automotive technology students who are currently participating in internships paying $10 per hour plus uniforms: Zachary Herron and Justin Parker, Dorchester School Bus Maintenance Shop, St. George; and William Meyers, Osman White and Marquize Young, Orangeburg School Bus Maintenance Shop.

Career and Technical Education Director Aldean Gilmore said she's proud of all of the students and encourages each program at Lake Marion Technology Center to institute a work-based learning experience, adding that it is very important for students to have a real-life experience in their desired careers. Gilmore said high school is the best setting for students to practice and demonstrate the skills needed in the workplace.

"The work-based learning experiences will give the students the opportunity to find out if this is really the career choice that they want to pursue. However, if students decide to select another field of study, they will have work experience to use for their employability," she said.

Gilmore said she encourages all students to enroll in a CATE program to increase their work skills and explore careers.

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