In "The Iliad," Homer wrote, "You will certainly not be able to take the lead in all things yourself." That is not true at the chess board, but it is at the bridge table. You usually need to cooperate with your partner. However, occasionally, opportunity will knock solely on your door. In today's deal, what should West lead against one no-trump?

If South had opened one club, perhaps his side could have reached two clubs (after one club - one diamond - one heart - two clubs - pass), which could have been made, but would have required a little guesswork.

As you are well aware, West will usually pick fourth-highest from his longest and strongest. Here, that would be the club three. Then what might happen?

To be honest, I am not fond of that club choice. Even though West knows that East has some values, it is dangerous to lead from a king-jack holding around to a strong, balanced hand. Also relevant is that North did not run to a major.

Here, after the club lead, declarer does best to win with dummy's queen, cross to the club ace and play a heart toward dummy's jack. But without x-ray vision, South might well win trick one in hand and lead that low heart. Then, though, West can take the trick with his queen and play anything but another club to defeat the contract.

I much prefer the spade-queen lead. Suppose declarer wins in his hand and plays a heart. West wins and continues with the spade jack. The defenders will take two spades, one heart, three diamonds and one club.

Touching honors often lead.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0

Load comments