Notre Dame rips
NCAA's decision

Notre Dame's president ripped the NCAA's decision to deny the school's appeal to restore 21 vacated football victories from an academic misconduct violation, saying the association "perverted" the notion that universities determine how they police academics.

The NCAA denied Notre Dame's appeal Tuesday, wiping off the books all 12 wins from the Fighting Irish's 2012 national championship game run under coach Brian Kelly.

In a letter to Notre Dame alumni, University President Fr. John Jenkins says the penalty was unprecedented considering who was involved in the misconduct, and the school was being punished for rigorously enforcing its honor code. 

The NCAA also fined the school $5,000 and placed it on one years' probation after finding academic misconduct orchestrated by the trainer.

NCAA considers
transfer reform

The NCAA is considering allowing athletes who are doing well in the classroom to transfer with immediate eligibility and permitting incoming freshmen to back out of a national letter of intent if there is a head coaching change.

The NCAA's Division I transfer working group concluded two days of meetings on Tuesday in Indianapolis. Justin Sell, the group chairman and athletic director at South Dakota State, said the group examined data on how transferring impacts academics as it develops concepts for rule reforms that could be presented to coaches, administrators and student-athletes for feedback.

The group will meet again in April and plans to have a model it can present to NCAA membership for comment. 

The NCAA would like to create uniformity in transfer rules, instead of rules that currently change from sport to sport and conference to conference. In some sports such as golf and volleyball, athletes already can use a one-time exception to transfer without sitting out a season at the new school. In basketball and football, they must sit out or request a waiver from the NCAA.

Reich to helm Colts

INDIANAPOLIS — Frank Reich did some of his most memorable work in relief.

He engineered the biggest comeback in NFL playoff history while pinch-hitting for Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly. He orchestrated the second-largest comeback in college football history after spending three years as Boomer Esiason's understudy. Heck, he even won a Super Bowl with a backup quarterback.

So when the Indianapolis Colts offered Reich a chance to be their second choice as head coach, the super sub figured it was the perfect it.

Reich inherits a team that went 4-12 in 2017, missed the playoffs for the third straight year and was desperately trying to remove an embarrassing stain following last week's announcement that New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels would not take the Colts' job.

Jack Morris tours Hall of Fame

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.  —  Jack Morris settled into a director's chair inside the Baseball Hall of Fame's Plaque Gallery, a satisfied smile creasing his face.

"You walk into this room and it's like the Holy Grail," Morris said after touring baseball's shrine for the first time in preparation for his induction this summer. "It's what baseball dreams are made of for every kid. Now, I get to be a part of that group. It's overwhelming.

The long wait for the 62-year-old Morris ended in December when he and former Detroit Tigers teammate Alan Trammell were selected for induction by a committee that considered older players and executives. They will be enshrined July 29 along with Vladimir Guerrero, Chipper Jones, Jim Thome and Trevor Hoffman, who were elected in January by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

"I began to wonder, but I never gave up hope," said Morris. 

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