• North-Carolina Weekly Gazette - June 26, 1778: The total eclipse of June 24, 1778, was the first of its kind for the newly independent, but still-at-war United States of America. It first entered the continent in Spanish-, French-, and British-controlled land and then slid out into the Atlantic Ocean through Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland. New Bern, North Carolina, was close to the southern edge of the eclipse path and the North-Carolina Weekly Gazette printed this report of the event, noting that the weather was clear and that it was observed with "some surprise to the ignorant."
  • Washington National Intelligencer - June 18, 1806: The total eclipse of June 16, 1806, entered North America from the Spanish-controlled Southwest, moved across the continent in a northeasterly direction, and crossed over parts of Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, and several other New England states. Although the path of totality missed Washington, D.C., the National Intelligencer published this account of the partial eclipse as seen from the young nation's capital, reporting that clouds spoiled most of the event for observers. 
  • Gettysburg Republican Banner - Dec. 9, 1834: The total eclipse of November 30, 1834, swept down into the U.S. from western Canada and crossed over a wide swath of territories and states before exiting the country in South Carolina and Georgia. In Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, it was only an 88 percent partial eclipse, but it apparently made quite an impression on the author of an article that appeared in the Gettysburg Republican Banner on Dec. 9. The writer dedicates nearly half of his column to reflections about the "triumphs of science over ignorance and superstition" and "how wonderful a proof is this of the uniformity of the laws of nature."
  • Baltimore Daily Exchange - July 17, 1860: In the midst of a divisive presidential election and with secession only five months away, America can be excused if it didn't show much enthusiasm for the total eclipse of July 18, 1860. It also didn't help that the path of totality traveled only through Oregon and Washington Territory. Still, many newspapers did publish short reports about the eclipse. This article from the Daily Exchange notes the scientific importance of the eclipse. Interestingly, the dates it references for other past and future eclipses are incorrect. It also incorrectly reports that the path of the 1860 eclipse would begin in Texas instead of off the coast of Oregon.
  • New York Sun - Aug. 9, 1869: The total eclipse of Aug. 7, 1869, was a highly anticipated event, entering the U.S. in Montana Territory and crossing over several large cities before exiting the country in North Carolina. The eclipse wasn't total in New York, but the New York Sun provided its readers with reports from various locations along the path of totality and a local account by a New Yorker who witnessed the 87 percent partial eclipse from Brooklyn Heights. The witness notes that the light diminished enough that the steam from the ships on the river appeared to darken from white to brown. The other reports are from Des Moines, Iowa, Wilmington, North Carolina, Springfield and Mattoon, Illinois, and a strange account of meteor showers during the eclipse from Shelbyville, Kentucky.
  • New York Herald - July 30, 1878: The total eclipse of July 29, 1878, was a bonanza for scientists and astronomers, with even Thomas Edison traveling west to observe it. On July 30, the New York Herald published this late-breaking telegraph dispatch from the path of totality in Wyoming Territory. It describes the various experiments carried out by members of several expedition teams and their speculations on the nature of the Sun's corona. Edison, after his temporary observatory almost blew down in a wind storm, was able to measure the heat of the corona and one professor even claimed he observed the hypothetical planet Vulcan between Mercury and the Sun.
  • Norfolk Virginian-Pilot - May 29, 1900: After the total eclipse of May 28, 1900, swept across a wide swath of the southern U.S., it exited the country at Norfolk, Virginia. The next day, the eclipse was front-page news, with the Virginian-Pilot giving it a huge four-column headline. The newspaper reports that the eclipse was the "sight of a life-time" and President McKinley observed it from a ship anchored off Norfolk. As late as 1900, astronomers were still looking for the hypothetical planet Vulcan between Mercury and the Sun, but no possibilities were sighted during totality by the many scientists on hand.
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