Did you miss Monday's eclipse? Were you here and want to remember the event? Here's our coverage from the years of preparation to the complete totality over Casper.

  • Shane Sanderson 307-266-0624 shane.sanderson@trib.com
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The festivities surrounding the solar eclipse are bringing police bike patrols to the streets of Casper. And don’t expect them to disappear when the sun returns.

  • Christine Peterson 307-746-3121, Christine.Peterson@trib.com
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Fire bans cropping up across Wyoming indicate how dry and windy the state can be in August. But this year the bans also reflect worries over the tens of thousands of visitors expected to arrive here this weekend for Monday’s solar eclipse.

  • Katie King 307-266-0581, Katie.King@trib.com
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Thousands of tourists are expected to visit Casper to view the Aug. 21 solar eclipse. Across Natrona County, government agencies are working to help visitors and locals safely enjoy the event.

  • Katie King 307-266-0581, Katie.King@trib.com
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An estimated 35,000 tourists are expected to descend on Casper to view the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, but there’s no reason for local residents to panic because officials are prepared.

  • Arno Rosenfeld 307-266-0634, arno.rosenfeld@trib.com
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When a woman from London bought 20 of his eclipse-themed t-shirts for her family back home, Rob Staffig-Piotter figured he was on to something. A year after he created the original design, the owner of Whitelace-n-Promises in downtown Casper has already sold 1,000 of the shirts, mostly to locals.

  • Arno Rosenfeld 307-266-0634, arno.rosenfeld@trib.com
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Casper is making an exception to its blue laws for bar owners during the eclipse festival in August. Bars and liquor stores in the Oil City are allowed to serve and sell until 2 a.m. on every day but Sunday — when they must close four hours earlier.

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By the time this article is in print, it will be less than 40 days until eclipse day. For those who have just returned from an extended trip to the Congo or who have been living under a rock for the past six months, the news that a solar eclipse is coming may be a bit of a shock. Yet even those who have known about the eclipse for some time may still be under some misconceptions about the eclipse, how to observe it and what kinds of things happen during an eclipse. In order to alleviate any confusion, let’s look at some myths and facts about eclipses.

  • Elysia Conner 307-266-0509, Elysia.Conner@trib.com
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The David Street Station’s inaugural musical lineup began Friday with a drum tap off and cymbals crashing. A crowd lined the astro-turf step seating and gate as the drum battle started.

  • Shane Sanderson 307-266-0624 shane.sanderson@trib.com
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People in groups of three and four moseyed down Second Street on Friday afternoon as the Wyoming Eclipse Festival began with relatively light crowds.

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How does a city of roughly 60,000 prepare for an invasion of (maybe) 35,000 eclipse enthusiasts? With lots of calls, and meetings, and more calls, and patience. To get an idea of the logistics and planning that go into preparing for the celestial celebration, the Star-Tribune spoke recently with Anna Wilcox. The executive director of the eclipse festival, Wilcox was hired last year to ready the city and to ensure nobody would be in the dark before they were really in the dark.

  • Brady Oltmans 307-266-0615, Brady.Oltmans@trib.com
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Hungry patrons at The Gaslight Social awaited their food among a bustling crowd during the Sunday lunch hour. Arriving customers stared up at the list of beers on top. Blacktooth Brewing Co. of Sheridan was listed eight times.

  • Shane Sanderson 307-266-0624 shane.sanderson@trib.com
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Traffic increased along Interstate 25 — the main corridor connecting Wyoming and Colorado — Sunday as tourists flocked to Casper for Monday’s eclipse.

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