I previously shared a sermon with T&D readers focused on helping us prepare for the incoming President of the United States (POTUS). Whether we voted for or against him, or if we even voted at all, you and I are responsible for the 45th President of the United States, Donald John Trump.

In the New Testament, Apostle Paul wrote two letters to whom he called his son in the faith, Timothy. In his first letter, he gave Timothy these instructions:

1) "First of all, then, I admonish and urge that petitions, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be offered on behalf of all men,

2) "For kings and all who are in positions of authority or high responsibility, that (outwardly) we may pass a quiet and undisturbed life (and inwardly) a peaceable one in all godliness and reverence and seriousness in every way.

3) For such (praying) is good and right, and (it is) pleasing and acceptable to God our Savior. 1 Timothy 2:1-3 (AMPC)

Paul urged his protege to not only pray, but also to petition and pray to God, intercede and even offer thanksgiving on behalf of those in high positions of authority. His words send a clarion call to those of us who trust the writings in the Bible to be the inspired Word of God. Paul made it resoundingly clear that intense praying for our leaders produces a quiet and peaceable life for all.

If we don’t like what’s occurring in our government, whose fault is it, really? If we refuse to pray the way Paul strongly suggested, what do we expect will happen in the world? We get what we pray for, what we really pray for. Paul was very specific about the required communication we are expected to offer to God if we want a peaceful life. Casually taking only a couple seconds to utter, “God bless America,” isn’t going to meet the requirements of the fervent prayer he firmly recommended and stated would bring tremendous results.

The scripture text above is amongst my most favorite verses from the Bible because we are clearly told what to pray for, how to pray for it and the expected results God promises to supply. It’s like knowing all the answers on a final exam. There’s no way to lose unless we decline to apply what we know.

The Apostle ended that part of his letter by asserting that praying for leadership is not only good and right, but it pleases God. We would love to have a well-pleasing life on the earth, but do we do what pleases God to enjoy such a life? Often I think about whose pleasure is more important in a situation, mine or God’s? Fact: If we please God, we will never have to wonder if He will reciprocate favor.

Dr. Shane Wall is the senior pastor of The Feast of the Lord in Orangeburg.

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